Archive for the ‘Slackware’ Category

A little caveat to make USB Modem like ZTE to work on Slackware:

Download usb-modeswitch source from here
and
usb-modeswitch data

Extract it:

tar jxvf usb-modeswitch-1.1.2.tar.bz2
tar jxvf usb-modeswitch-data-20100418.tar.bz2

And Install:

cd usb-modeswitch-1.1.2
make
su
make install
cd ../usb-modeswitch-data-20100418
make install

The USB Modem should be working now ;)

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It’s quite an easy and painless process actually but I always forget the step, so I write it here for my own reminder, hope this can help others too ;)

First for apache’s mod-ssl (https) to work, we have to create a certificate.

Creating a certificate

Generate the keys for the Certificate Signing Request (CSR):

openssl genrsa -des3 -out server.key 1024

Create the insecure key, the one without a passphrase:

openssl rsa -in server.key -out server.key.insecure

Shuffle the key names:

mv server.key server.key.secure

mv server.key.insecure server.key

Create the CSR:

openssl req -new -key server.key -out server.csr

Create the self-signed certificate:

openssl x509 -req -days 365 -in server.csr -signkey server.key -out server.crt

Install the key file server.key and certificate file server.crt:

sudo cp server.crt /etc/ssl/certs

sudo cp server.key /etc/ssl/private

Ubuntu:

Enable the mod_ssl module:

sudo a2enmod ssl

Restart the service to enable the new settings:

sudo /etc/init.d/apache2 restart

Slackware:

Edit httpd.conf

pico /etc/httpd/httpd.conf

Enable the mod_ssl module, remove the comment in front of this line:

LoadModule ssl_module lib/httpd/modules/mod_ssl.so
and this:
Include /etc/httpd/extra/httpd-ssl.conf

Change the location of certificate:

SSLCertificateFile “/etc/httpd/server.crt”
to:
SSLCertificateFile “/etc/ssl/certs/server.crt”

SSLCertificateKeyFile “/etc/httpd/server.key”
to:
SSLCertificateKeyFile “/etc/ssl/private/server.key”

Restart apache:

/etc/rc.d/rc.httpd restart

Last but not least, don’t forget to check the webserver directory on apache’s mod-ssl config:

Ubuntu:

pico /etc/apache2/sites-enabled/default-ssl

Slackware:

pico /etc/httpd/extra/httpd-ssl.conf

Change filename CASE

Posted: August 29, 2011 in Linux, Slackware, Ubuntu
Tags:

There was time when I see some old files from DOS/WINDOWS with UPPERCASE letter and I wanted so bad to change the case but forgot the command, so I wrote it here so I know where to look again ;)

rumy@cbug-nest:~$ rename ‘y/A-Z/a-z/’ *
(assuming perl was installed on the system)

(or without perl)
rumy@cbug-nest:~$ for i in *; do mv $i `echo $i | tr [:upper:] [:lower:]`; done

My desktop PC processor is actually a 64-bit AMD, I’ve installed almost all 32-bit Linux Distro on it but never a 64-bit one.

Last night after download a 64-bit Ubuntu I decided to give it a try, and to my surprise the installation and update went smooth.

And oh, it read and used all my 4 GB RAM (added 2 GB before installation), so my lil security research lab on VMware will have at least 4 to 8 OS in it ;)

Just realized that there’s a new driver for Realtek 8172 Wireless Card, it’s on Realtek website here:

Realtek 8172/8192 Wireless Card Driver

Download, extract, open command shell, su to root and then do:

make

make install

Reboot … and after that the Wireless card should be working fine ^^

I put this here so I know where to look when I need the command ;)

For files:

find . -type -f -exec chmod 644 {} \;

For directories:

find . -type -d -exec chmod 755 {} \;

Hope this will help others :)

Find this when searching for Japanese’s font solution on BackTrack :

Slackware is not the most user-friendly of distros; or rather, as the Unix joke goes, it’s picky about who its friends are. On the other hand, it has distinct advantages in terms of flexibility, simplicity and a charming literalness of mind. It does not, however, speak many languages ‘out of the box’.

true … ^^